A Master Is Given His Due

Maxwell: Early Novels And Stories; Later Novels And Stories
(Library of America, two volumes, $35 each)

When William Maxwell died in 2000 at the age of 91, America lost one of its greatest writers. While widely loved within the literary world, he was not a celebrity, a marquee name on par with Salinger or Cheever or Updike, all three of whom Maxwell edited for the New Yorker. Now, with the release of the Library of America’s two- volume edition of his fiction, William Maxwell may finally take his place beside his more famous friends and contemporaries.

Associated Press

Associated Press

read more (Wall Street Journal)

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Small Wonder

THE STORIES IN Michael Chabon’s second collection, Werewolves in their Youth, showcase his prodigious talents and touch on his major concerns–hope, loneliness, and the powers of the imagination. His work here is stronger and more sure-footed than ever, and fans of his novels The Mysteries of Pittsburgh (1988) and the more recent Wonder Boys (1995) will be left satisfied and asking for more.

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The Voyage

PHILIP CAPUTO’S new novel The Voyage (Knopf, $26.00) is an old-fashioned book. Set for the most part around the turn of the century, it chronicles the adventures of the three Braithwaite brothers as they pilot their father’s schooner Double Eagle down the east coast. As in any boy’s sea story, the young Braithwaites must test themselves against the inevitable calamities to earn their manhood.

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The Street Lawyer

JOHN GRISHAM’S ninth novel, The Street Lawyer, follows the basic formula of his other bestsellers, taking a jaded lawyer disillusioned with the American system of justice and–through a series of dire and not always believable events–leading him back to his original idealism through the true promise of those same institutions.

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Six Figures

FRED G. LEEBRON’S provocative second novel takes on the frustrations of the young American middle class, born to privilege and fearful they may fail in their expected pursuit of success.  By painstakingly dissecting the thwarted aspirations of its main character, Warner Lutz, it serves as a cautionary tale for the nasdaq generation.

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